In most cases, it is cheaper to buy a house in Canada than it is to rent for a long period of time. If you have the resources to buy, home ownership is more than likely a smart investment. Every time you make a mortgage payment, you are essentially paying down the principal and taking a step towards owning a piece of property that will appreciate over time. Think of your mortgage payment as an investment or a savings strategy: if you sell your house down the road, you’ll not only get back the money you’ve paid out but also likely turn a profit. If you stay put long enough, this can grow into a very healthy nest egg.

 

Of course, there are no guarantees and even buying a house comes with risks. In the past, CMHC has warned about overvaluation in certain areas of Canada’s housing market, but for the most part, buying a house in Canada is a safe bet. Just make sure to buy within your budget and plan to hold onto the place for more than five years.

 

The money saved over a mortgage's lifespan can result in tens of thousands of dollars, if not hundreds of thousands. That's more money in your pocket today. With a heated housing marketing, rental prices are soaring, and statistics are constantly showing that home ownership can be equivalent to your rental rate each month, if not less. Why get stuck in a small 2 bedroom apartment if you can move into a 3 bedroom house with a great backyard and pay a monthly rate that is the same?

 

There is also the fear that a home can keep you "stuck" or "rooted" to one place, without an easy transition out if you decide to move. Although the future of the housing market isn't easily predictable from location to location, you can always discuss with your agent about buying a home in an area that has a strong turn-over rate when a home hits the market. The equity build up when it comes time to sell is going to be far more beneficial than if you put money into a rental and decided to move. The money from selling the property can be used to purchase a new home. With renting, there would be no additional funds to transition into a new place. 

 

Now imagine if you were renting a home for $2000/month. If your landlord is renting to make a profit, think how much less you'd be paying on a monthly basis towards your mortgage, if the home was yours. Then you wouldn't be paying a landlord to profit off of you, you'd be paying a reasonable rate, and get to call the property your own. Discuss with your agent and lender the steps you need to take towards home ownership, and you just might be happily surprised about the type of home you can afford to move into.